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Brekkie

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New prints available in store! http://lunarbaboon.bigcartel.com/product/community-pack

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Linty linty

jwz
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I have spent the last few days down in the PHP Mines. Those fumes are really toxic. I'm pretty sure I've contracted pleurisy from inhaling Cheetos dust.

So DNA Lounge has an online store, which is an enormous, and ancient, and shitty, pile of PHP code. I have often characterized it as "it's a pile of shit, but it's our pile of shit."

Well, now that I'm opening a new nightclub, I need to make that code be able to function when installed on a domain whose name is not "dnalounge.com". As you can expect, this has been a process of discovering all kinds of hardcoded assumptions lurking in the bowels. It's like moving to a new house after you've been dug in for a decade: look at all this crap stuffed in the back of the closet that you didn't remember was there!

So there has been a lot of global search and replace, and a lot of variables being added and moved around, and that means destabilization, and that's bad, mmkay?

So I wrote a Perl program to do static analysis of PHP. And it parses PHP using regular expressions because fuck you that's why.

For your entertainment -- because I sincerely doubt that anyone who is not me will ever use this without lulz in their heart -- I give you jwz-php-lint.pl.

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jimwise
1 day ago
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Heh...

Gefahr für Gefahrengebiete

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Den berühmt-berüchtigten Hamburger “Gefahrengebieten” geht es an den Kragen. Das Oberverwaltungsgericht Hamburg hält die komplette Regelung für verfassungswidrig. Sie ermöglicht es der Hamburger Polizei, in vorher festgelegten Stadtteilen Personen ohne Anlass zu kontrollieren und ihre mitgeführten Sachen in Augenschein zu nehmen.

Geklagt hat eine Besucherin des Schanzenviertels. Die Polizei hatte während der “Walpurgisnacht” am 30. April 2014 erst ihre Personalien festgestellt, dann ihren Rucksack kontrolliert und sie anschließend für mehrere Stunden in Gewahrsam genommen. Einen konkreten Anlass für die Maßnahmen hatte die Klägerin nicht gegeben. Die Polizei berief sich lediglich darauf, sie dürfe in dem ausgewiesenen Gefahrengebiet beliebig kontrollieren.

Die Gefahrengebiete sind verfassungswidrig, heißt es in dem heute verkündeten Urteil. Der fragliche Paragraf 4 Abs. 2 des Gesetzes über die Datenverarbeitung der Polizei verstoße gegen das rechtsstaatliche Bestimmtheitsgebot und gegen den Grundsatz der Verhältnismäßigkeit.

Die Vorschrift gebe nicht klar genug die Voraussetzungen für die Ausweisung eines Gefahrengebiets vor. Vielmehr bleibe es weitgehend der Polizei überlassen zu entscheiden, ob und für wie lange ein Gefahrengebiet ausgewiesen und dort Personen verdachtsunabhängig überprüft werden könnten.

Das Gesetz erlaube überdies Eingriffe in die Bürgerrechte einzelner von erheblichem Gewicht. Dabei gehe es aber nur um die Abwehr “abstrakter” Gefahren. Die einzelnen hätten jedoch für die gegen sie gerichtete Maßnahmen keinen konkreten Anlass gegeben. Die damit verbundene Belastung sei nicht angemessen (Link zur Entscheidung).

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Mystery of dog found alone on top of England's highest mountain

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An animal welfare charity has launched an appeal to locate the owner of a dog found wandering on the top of the highest mountain in England. The black and tan male collie cross was picked up at the summit of Scafell Pike in the Lake District on Saturday by a couple of Scottish holidaymakers.



Concerned about its well-being, they took it home and handed it to the Scottish SPCA rescue centre in Glasgow. The charity now wants to locate the owner of the dog, nicknamed Scafell. The dog, which had not been microchipped, is believed to be aged between five and eight years old.

Described as "petrified and nervous" when found, it took the couple, from Maybole, South Ayrshire, about half an hour to coax it over to them. Anna O'Donnell, from the Glasgow centre, said: "At this stage it's all a bit of a mystery but we believe Scafell may have been taken up the mountain by his owner and become lost.



"There is also a chance he was abandoned and made his own way up to the top. It would be fantastic if we are able to reunite him with his owner if he has gone missing. If not, we will find him a loving new home in Scotland." At 978m (3,209ft), Scafell Pike is the highest peak in England.
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Twin brothers arrested for throwing bricks at each other

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Twin 52-year-old brothers from Orange City in Florida are facing the same charge after throwing bricks at each other during an argument, police said.

James and Michael Remelius were arguing with each other in the front yard of a home at about 8:45pm on Tuesday when Michael picked up a brick and threatened to throw it at his brother, according to a police report.



James then picked up a brick in a threatening manner. Michael threw his brick and hit his brother in the leg, causing a small cut, according to the report. James then threw his brick and struck Michael in the right eye, causing bleeding and swelling.

The brothers were both charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and taken to Volusia County Branch Jail, where James is being held on $25,000 bail. Michael’s bail is set at $20,000.
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Trust in police is at a low ebb. Here’s one way to fix it

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When was the last time you had a neighbourly chat with an on-duty police officer? You know, just a how’s your day going, sir or ma’am, lovely morning, keep up the good work, etcetera and so on. We’re not going to say it never happens, but we’d venture that it is extremely rare. Most of us know the police only as those people in uniform who drive around our neighbourhoods in cruisers with tinted windows while wearing wraparound sunglasses. Actual human interaction is rare. When it does happen, it is tinged with the threat of confrontation. They are not us. And that is not how it’s supposed to be.

If you argue at this point that the police are indeed not us and shouldn’t be, you’re wrong. The police are an elemental part of our communities. We create them, regulate them and pay them. We put huge trust in them by giving them powers of detention and arrest, as well as permission to use deadly force, so they can keep order and make us feel safe. They were never meant to be a distant force, imposing order from on high, with its own culture and internal rules.

We have spent much of the past week decrying the erosion of the vital trust that allows police to operate effectively. The steady diet of fresh online videos showing officers turning routine stops into violent confrontations and then lying about it is reaching a tipping point. In Toronto, the Police Service’s decision to continue the controversial policy of “carding,” where officers randomly stop innocent people and treat them as though they were under investigation by demanding ID, only adds to the sense that police operate in a world that is detached from ours.

An Ontario Superior Court ruling on May 7 crystallized this sentiment when it found that a Toronto police officer “took the law into his own hands and administered some street justice” to a man he was attempting to card in 2011. The constable falsely arrested a Sudanese immigrant who was innocently walking home from his mosque, and punched him twice in the face when he mildly resisted the infringement of his rights. The judge awarded the man $27,000 in a decision that fairly drips with sarcasm about the behaviour of the officers involved and their obviously backfilled testimony. The judge expressed “disapproval and shock” that the officers seemed to be operating under the impression that unconstitutionally detaining, searching, abusing and assaulting an innocent man was standard procedure.

This erosion of trust is a crisis. Modern policing in Canada is an outgrowth of the Peelian Principles, a set of guidelines developed by Sir Robert Peel, the British home secretary who established London’s first professional police force in 1829. Chief among them is the idea that the public is policed by consent, not by the authority of the state. The ability of police officers to do their job is dependent on the public’s approval of their existence, actions and behaviour. We need the police, and the police need us.

If that approval is missing, then police can’t function with any democratic legitimacy. Absent that, the only power they have derives from the inertia of their existence – they’re not going anywhere, and you can’t live without them, so what are you going to do if they misbehave?

The staggering thing about the growing distance between the public and those who keep public order is that most North American police departments believe that they are practitioners of what is known as “community policing.” It’s a philosophy developed in the 1970s in response to the violence and decay in inner cities of that era. Police chiefs and their overseers are great defenders on paper of the Peelian principle that they must work with the community to prevent crime. They do it through consultations, public meetings and presences at schools and public events. It can be an effective way of reducing crime and building trust.

But calling it “community policing” does not, by itself, mean you’re part of the community. Not if your officers play by their own rules and deliver street justice. It is telling that one of the solutions to the problem of trust is to put a body camera on officers, as Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver and other Canadian cities are doing, and as many U.S. cities have already done. It is a move we entirely support. But it is regrettable that it has come to this. If officers have to record their every interaction with the public as a form of guarantee that they will play by the rules, then we are at a low point in policing history.

We can’t help thinking that the entire face of policing would change if more officers got out of their cars and off their bikes, and got to know the communities and people they serve – on foot. Officers should be assigned permanently to neighbourhoods and greet the people there with “courtesy and friendly good humour,” as the Peelian principles have it. They should be a visible, integrated part of communities and shed their bunker mentality. There should be more random conversations, a fewer random confrontations. In an overwhelmingly law-abiding country like Canada, this should be the norm. And it shouldn’t be hard.

Because the public wants the police. We know they make a sacrifice by taking on the dangerous jobs that civilians have no taste for. We resent people who deliberately antagonize them. We are on the side of order. We just want the police to remember where their power comes from.

Imagine an officer saying hello to you in a friendly way. Imagine if you’d seen the officer the day before, and the day before that. You might cringe at first, but slowly you’d get to know the person behind the badge. Then they would be us.

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