Resident of the world, traveling the road of life
4995 stories
·
9 followers

Shipments Diverted To East Coast During Contract Dispute Probably Won’t Come Back

1 Share

Here’s the thing with container ships: you can move them. That’s the point, actually, so it’s not surprising that instead of waiting in long lines to have their cargo unloaded while the Pacific Maritime Association and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union spent nine months in a contract dispute. Some ships were diverted to the East Coast, and it’s possible that those shipments may never come back to the West Coast.

The two sides reached an agreement with the help of the Secretary of Labor, and it will take a few months both to ratify the contract and to clear the massive backlog of cargo that’s lined up at the West Coast ports. Yet some shippers have moved their business to ports on the East Coast, or in Canada or Mexico, in order to avoid the hassles of going through ports on the West Coast of the United States during the last few months. One company that comprised most of the business for an entire terminal at the port of Portland, for example, is no longer sending shipments to Portland at all.

Call it Frank Sobotka’s Revenge. Yes, that’s a fictional character, but an important symbol of what’s happening here. He was a fictional port workers’ union president in the HBO series “The Wire,” who went to great lengths to keep work from drying up at the port of Baltimore. Indeed, things are booming over in Baltimore, with shipping container up 10% since the slowdown began.

San Francisco Business Timesk Some cargo diverted during West Coast port slowdown may never come back [Business Journals]

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

DEA Agent Says Legalizing Medical Marijuana In Utah Will Lead To Stoned Rabbits

2 Shares

There are many arguments for and against using marijuana legally in this country, whether for medical use or for fun, but one drug enforcement official’s reason for his stance against legalizing it in Utah is surely one nobody’s about to forget: He says wild bunnies will get high off the stuff.

The state is currently mulling a bill that would allow people with certain medical conditions to be treated with edible forms of marijuana, reports the Washington Post.

During a Utah Senate panel on the topic last week, an agent of the Drug Enforcement Administration weighed in with his testimony, saying that if the bill passes, the state’s bunnies may “cultivate a taste” for the plant. Once they’re baked, they won’t be afraid of humans and will just sit around in their parents’ basements eating dandelion greens.

DEA Special Agent Matt Fairbanks spoke about the environmental costs associated with growing a bunch of pot on public land, mentioning all the pesticides, chemicals and possibilities for deforestation and erosion.

“The ramifications to the flora, the animal life, the contaminated water, are still unknown,” he said, adding that at some marijuana grow sites, he saw “rabbits that had cultivated a taste for the marijuana. … . One of them refused to leave us, and we took all the marijuana around him, but his natural instincts to run were somehow gone.”

On the one hand, points out the Post, illegally farming anything can hurt the environment. But on the other hand, if it was legal to grow marijuana, the state would be able to regulate how it’s cultivated on farms and in gardens instead of tucked away in the mountains.

The specter of stoned rabbits roaming lethargically through the mountain passes wasn’t enough to convince the panel against the bill, as it approved it and sent it to the full Senate. It’ll be debated this week.

Now while we all think about the stoned bunnies, let’s remember to never feed Fido or Mr. Furrykins McCatterson pot.

DEA warns of stoned rabbits if Utah passes medical marijuana [Washington Post]

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

Coca-Cola Pulls Fanta Ad Suggesting Nazi Germany Was “Good Old Times” – Consumerist

1 Share

In a recent video recounting the birth of Fanta soft drinks, Coca-Cola explains that its German operation had trouble getting cola-making ingredients to the country’s bottling plants 75 years ago, leading the bottlers to dream up a beverage they could make without Coca-Cola syrup. Perhaps Coke was hoping people wouldn’t do the math and realize that the reason for the syrup scarcity had a little something to do with the Nazis.

Not only does the above Fanta 75th anniversary clip (in German) skip right over the role World War II and trade embargoes against Nazi Germany played in the development of the drink, but it states that Fanta wants to bring “the feeling of the Good Old Times back,” according to the The Express.

A decidedly negative online response to the video has resulted in Coca-Cola, which said the ad was intended to evoke “positive childhood memories,” pulling the official clip and apologizing for hinting that Nazi Germany is something worth recalling through rose-colored glasses.

The company is also quick to deny the long-held rumors that the Nazis had anything to do with Fanta, saying that while the beverage “was invented in Germany during the Second World War… the 75-year-old brand had no association with Hitler or the Nazi Party.”

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

California Suing Wine Bottle Maker Over Claims That It Uses Glass Containing Toxic Materials

1 Share

While acknowledging that a California glass company isn’t necessarily posing any threat to consumers with its actions, state officials are suing a Modesto business that it says recycles hazardous materials illegally and includes them in new wine bottles.

Gallo Glass Co. in Modesto, CA is the target of a lawsuit made public yesterday by authorities in California, reports the Modesto Bee.

Though officials point out they don’t know if there’s any threat to consumers, the suit alleges that the the plant illegally recycled hazardous dust containing toxic substances like lead, arsenic, cadmium and selenium, which are byproducts of bottle making.

“We have no evidence that consuming wine (from those bottles) poses a health threat,” said the deputy director of the State Department of Toxic Substances Control.

There wouldn’t be any danger even if the bottles broke, the agency’s enforcement supervisor added. But the agency thinks the dust substance should be sent to a landfill, and says Gallo illegally stored it in an unpermitted tank.

Recycling the “precipitate,” as Gallo Glass calls it, is done in a way that the company says meets the highest federal standard for safe packaging, according to its website. Putting material in landfills is also “in direct conflict with California’s recycling goals,” the company said in a statement.

“The lawsuit has no merit,” Gallo Glass said in the statement, adding that it prides itself on employing “environmentally-friendly sustainable practices which the state is inexplicably challenging in this lawsuit.”

“We look forward to our day in court,” the statement adds.

State sues Gallo Glass over hazardous materials [Modesto Bee]

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

March 02, 2015

2 Comments and 6 Shares

POW
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
2 public comments
beslayed
1 day ago
reply
"Hello, set of all sets that do not contain themselves?"
rclatterbuck
1 day ago
reply
If only the Barber Paradox didn't come out as merely a restatement of the Russell's Paradox, I'd feel fine empirically lambasting philosophers.

03/02/15 PHD comic: 'Giant Leap'

2 Shares
Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham
www.phdcomics.com
Click on the title below to read the comic
title: "Giant Leap" - originally published 3/2/2015

For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories