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French baker ordered to remove 'racist' cakes

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A court in the French Riviera has ordered a cake maker to remove cakes from his bakery after he was accused of inciting racial hatred and the cakes branded "obscene". On Thursday a court in Grasse, in the Alpes-Maritimes department of south-eastern France, ordered the town to force the baker to remove the offensive pastries from his boulangerie, deeming them an “attack on human dignity”. The sweet pastries in question, named “Gods” and “Goddesses” are in the form of obese people, covered in dark chocolate with over-sized sexual parts.



While the baker who sells the little men and women filled with shortbread and chocolate mousse saw the cakes as inoffensive, for one anti-racism group in France, they were anything but. “It’s pure and simple racism,” Louis-George Tin from France’s Representative Council of Black Associations (CRAN) said prior to the court ruling. CRAN denounced the “obscene slave trade caricatures that tap into the tradition of colonial racism” and threatened to lodge a complaint for inciting racial hatred.



“We are in a country where the word equality is part of the constitution, which means it doesn’t allow for racism. Does he think these treats adhere to the values of the French Republic?” said Tin. “We must fight this kind of racism. I cannot imagine what would be said (rightly) if an African baker decided to represent Jesus Christ or the Virgin Mary in a similar way,” Tin said. However, baker Tannick Tavolaro is defiant.



He said he finds the complaint absurd and firmly denies he is racist. “At first I thought it was a joke. It’s absurd and hurtful. These pastries have absolutely no racial connotation at all," he said. They are made of chocolate mousse, which is why they're black. The characters are little human beings, a man and woman but not a black man and a woman. These people who attack me don’t know my story or my career or who I am. It’s just intellectual terrorism. I am not racist. I do not belong to any political party. I just argue for freedom of speech.”
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Moon Sliver

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March 27, 2015 at 07:22PM
via 500px <a href="http://ift.tt/196zBJm" rel="nofollow">http://ift.tt/196zBJm</a>
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Opportunity

4 Comments and 21 Shares
We all remember those famous first words spoken by an astronaut on the surface of Mars: "That's one small step fo- HOLY SHIT LOOK OUT IT'S GOT SOME KIND OF DRILL! Get back to the ... [unintelligible] ... [signal lost]"
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3 public comments
MaryEllenCG
2 days ago
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I really really really hope this happens.
Greater Bostonia
NielsRak
2 days ago
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Lets just say the first manned Mars mission better bring a boombox with some taped whale song...
JayM
2 days ago
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Hahahahaha
Boston Metro Area

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Relatively Terrible

4 Comments and 10 Shares

New comic!
Today's News:
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3 public comments
toddgrotenhuis
5 hours ago
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"Why are you so anxious?"
Indianapolis
lardissone
3 days ago
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Somebody will share it better than me! :@
Pergamino, Argentina
tante
3 days ago
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How awesome people around you might make you feel bad
Oldenburg/Germany

Psychotic Samurai sword-wielding man dressed as Shaolin monk injured six police officers

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Six police officers in Vienna, Austria, were injured by a psychotic man dressed as a Shaolin monk and wielding a Samurai sword on Monday.

Police spokesman Roman Hahslinger said that the drama started when a woman in an apartment in Kudlichgasse, in the Favoriten district, heard a loud knocking on her door at 2:00am. She opened the door to find a bald-headed man she had never met before dressed in an orange monk’s robe, and armed with a large sword. He pushed his way into her home, and she ran out and called the police.



Three police officers arrived at the building shortly afterwards and found the 39-year-old man in the stairwell. They surprised him with pepper spray and managed to knock the sword out of his hand but all three officers were seriously injured in the scuffle. As the man seemed to be suffering from mental illness they took him to the Rufolfstiftung psychiatric hospital.

However, he managed to escape from the hospital just hours later and was spotted in Meidling cemetery wearing a white hospital gown. When three police officers arrived he karate kicked and punched them. Again, they had to use pepper spray to subdue him and then took him back to hospital.
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Evaluating milk and its substitutes

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"Milk"

“Milk” at my local grocery store

I knew milk alternatives were becoming mainstream when a new bakery/café appeared in my neighborhood. I ordered a latte latté and learned that they didn’t use milk. At all. Not only were the baked goods was this place vegan, organic, “natural” and some were gluten-free, they were completely dairy-free for their coffee beverages. dairy-free too. While everything looked and smelled great, I was shocked that they had no milk on the premises. The milk alternative made with soy almonds didn’t taste bad, but it didn’t taste like milk. I left with my coffee, wondering how long the place would survive. I was wrong. It’s been a few years and the shop is still here, suggesting there’s a sizable appetite (at least in my laid-back, coffee-shop-saturated neighborhood) for milk-free, wheat-free vegan food and drinks. I shouldn’t be surprised. The number of people on restricted diets seems to be growing, and so have the food choices to meet their dietary demands. There have dietary demands. There’s always been people that avoided milk, milk but the reason was traditionally lactose intolerance intolerance, or dairy allergies. Now more are simply choosing to avoid it. I’m often asked about the merits of milk and the multiple milk alternatives, as the assessments of dairy seems to take one of two positions: Either milk is the dietary equivalent of unicorn tears, a nearly perfect food, or it is poison that’s almost certainly killing us. What’s clear is that we have more choice than ever for milk-like beverages. My local grocery is pictured above, where cow’s milk is just one small section. Who knew you could milk cashews?

I can understand and appreciate why people might not drink milk, for cultural reasons alone. I grew up drinking milk and eating dairy products regularly, but married into a family that didn’t drink or eat any at all. When my kids were young, we went through a lot of milk each week. Now that they’re older, our consumption’s dropped, as they almost always opt for eggs instead of cereal each morning. Given juice is tightly restricted in my home, milk’s now mainly for coffee, cooking, and helping the kids meet their vitamin D requirements. Whether it’s society’s declining devotion to breakfast cereal, concerns about animal welfare, or recognition that consuming milk simply isn’t essential, habits have changed. In North America consumption is dropping steadily over time, something the dairy industry seems unable to reverse. With the decline of milk, there has there’s been a rise in the number and types of milk-like beverages, raising the question of the relative merits.

Whether milk is “good” or “bad” and how it compares to the alternative “milks” depends on the question being asked. Good for what? Chemically, milk is emulsified fat in water that’s a good source of protein and several nutrients. If studying the effects of medication is difficult, that’s nothing compared to studying dietary interventions, where it’s exceptionally challenging to tease out cause and effect from studies which lack randomization and blinding. Correlation is not causation, and addressing all of the potential confounders seems nearly impossible. The result is trials with often equivocal results that are used to support nearly any position. Milk may be a good source of calcium, but consumption doesn’t seem related to fewer hip fractures as we age. It’s cited as an important part of the DASH diet, but DASH didn’t look at dairy in isolation. Cancer is often attributed to milk, but there’s a lack of convincing data. Even autism has been blamed on milk, a claim that’s never been substantiated. On balance, from a strictly  strictly a nutritional perspective, milk is probably neither good nor evil, especially when you consider it’s just one component of a diet. When consumed in moderation, there are almost certainly other factors, many controllable, that can have more significant effects on overall health (e.g., regular exercise, not smoking, and maintaining a healthy weight).

The alternatives to regular milk seem to have grown in popularity for different reasons. Organic milk caters to dietary preferences, but there’s no convincing evidence organic food is healthier. Lactose-free milk makes milk tolerable to those that lack the ability to digest the sugar lactose. Raw milk (where it’s legally sold) seems to exist for those that prioritize taste over the risk of a food-borne illness. Others are concerned about what else might be in milk. Just yesterday there was a report that milk may not always be free of antibiotic residues. Nobody wants (or should accept) ciprofloxacin in their milk, especially when any detectable amount is forbidden.

Malk: Now with Vitamin R

Oh, my bones are so brittle. But I always drink plenty of…”malk”?

There are more and more “milks” on the market. The most common ones are soy and almond, but you can also find rice, oat, coconut, potato, and even hemp milks for sale. Each has its own nutritional profile. Many are fortified (to mimic milk’s content) and often contain added sugars and flavors, so the nutritional profiles vary widely. (This CSPI table is among the more comprehensive). It’s important to note that plant-based milks lack the nutritional and caloric density of real milk, and are not a safe substitute in young children (<2 year). While there are nutritional differences between the products, eating an otherwise-balanced diet with plenty of variety is the probably the best approach to minimize the risk of dietary gaps. Total calories is one area where these products can vary significantly, and given liquid calories don’t seem to satiate like food, it is reasonable to conclude that consuming in moderation is probably best.

Almond milk is one of more popular “milks” now. It’s made by soaking ground-up almonds in water and then removing the solid matter.  Almond milk leverages the health halo that almonds currently enjoy, offering “good fats” and vitamins. Nutritionally, almond milk has a fraction of the protein of milk. One cup of almond milk contains the protein equivalent of just four almonds. There are only about four almonds of protein per cup of almond milk. Almonds, not almond milk, are a much more convenient and nutritionally-dense source of energy. The rest is expensive water, often fortified with vitamins and sometimes added sugar.

Soy milk was one of the earliest milk substitutes. Soy comes closest to real milk from a nutritional perspective, and some are fortified with vitamins to closely mimic real milk. Soy contains alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fatty acid too, but if if’ you’re not a vegan, you’d be better off eating other omega-3 sources. The relationship between soy and cancer is unclear.

Coconut milkis is a mix of coconut water and the thick coconut cream. Like other coconut products, there’s a fair amount of saturated fat.  They’re low in protein, and usually fortified with vitamins.

Rice milk is low in protein but usually has levels of calcium that approach real milk.  There are some concerns about arsenic levels, but the overall health impact isn’t clear.  Compared to the other milks, rice tends to come up short from a nutritional perspective.

Conclusion

If you enjoy drinking milk, milk. there’s no convincing evidence to suggest you’re doing your body badly. If you’re consuming milk strictly for the perceived health benefits, then it’s fine to omit it from your diet. Milk isn’t magical and it isn’t poison. The same applies to the milk substitutes. If you want a milk-like beverage to drink, then there are lots of choices, and you can probably find one that you find palatable and is also fortified to deliver many of the nutritional benefits of regular milk.

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