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John Searle Enters the Matrix

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Morpheus: \
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mkalus
29 minutes ago
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3 public comments
jlvanderzwan
22 days ago
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Just pretend that the batteries thing is misinformation spread by the machines, and that the original concept of the human brain being used as "wet-ware" to partially run the matrix as well as experience it, so that the machines may think like humans despite their silicon limitations, and the entire trilogy makes a lot more sense. Plus it becomes a muchtmore philosophically interesting musing on transhumanism by two trans directors
fxer
22 days ago
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Does this entirely rely on taking the word “dream” literally or am I missing something
Bend, Oregon
vpatil
23 days ago
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This comic and the comment afterwards tick all the boxes for me.

webshit weekly

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An annotated digest of the top "Hacker" "News" posts for the last week of March, 2020.

Pro drivers are competing with gamers after F1 and Nascar canceled races
March 22, 2020 (comments)
Advertising finds a way. Hackernews' response comes in three categories: Pro Racing Hackernews who live for the track and would like us to know that racing simulators are either flawless or irredeemable, Pro Gaming Hackernews who live for the livestream and would like us to know that real cars are exactly or not at all like computer games, and Pro Expert Hackernews, who are only here to find irrelevant nits to pick in the inapplicable information provided by the first two groups.

Jitsi Meet: An open source alternative to Zoom
March 23, 2020 (comments)
Some copyright cultists scream into the wind. Hackernews posts anecdotes about videoconferencing software. Some consideration is given as to whether Zoom's "virtual background" feature is crucial for quarantined work-for-home success, since it relieves the user of the last traces of desire to clean their living space in any way.

Zig cc: A drop-in replacement for GCC/Clang
March 24, 2020 (comments)
An Internet decides that clang is not complicated enough. The "programming language intended as a C replacement with extreme C interoperability" genre is one of Hackernews' favorites, so the story receives many votes, but nobody can figure out what the goal of this particular language is, whether anyone has ever actually used it, or why one would bother, so there aren't too many actual discussions. Most of what does get posted focuses on cross-compilation, as though that were either a feature people actually used or else one that hasn't been dead-simple (outside of GNU) since the 1980s.

Private client-side-only PWAs are hard, but now Apple made them impossible
March 25, 2020 (comments)
A webshit is mad that Apple won't let browser shit in its yard. Hackernews, deeply invested in webshit, Apple products, and yardshitting, is on the case. It turns out there are ways to authorize selected webshits to bypass the limitation whined about in the article, so Hackernews argues about whether Apple's communications team is good enough for a while, then the article's author posts an update: still mad. Elsewhere in the comment threads, Hackernews bitches that Apple and Google fuck up webshit in incompatible ways, and a Google shows up to reassure everyone that they're going to make the documentation better... real soon now.

Zoom iOS app sends data to Facebook even if you don’t have a Facebook account
March 26, 2020 (comments)
Vice dot com is a website that sends data back to Google, Facebook, and Segment, even if you don't have a Facebook account. But someone at the office made Hackernews use Zoom, so they're on the warpath about that EULA they accepted. Hackernews is outraged about whatever indiscernible difference may exist between Zoom's data collection practices and the data collection practices that pay for Hackernews' studio in San Mateo. [Editor's note: we have been informed that Hackernews has in fact moved to a studio in Oakland.] Zoom-the-company modifies Zoom-the-computer-program to discontinue the outrageous API requests, but Hackernews is still mad, because there's nothing better to do.

Zoom needs to clean up its privacy act
March 27, 2020 (comments)
An Internet is still mad about the videoconference software from yesterday, and writes a blog post that sends data back to Wordpress, even if you don't have a Wordpress account. It also sends data directly to the webshit's personal stats server running piwik, because you just cannot have enough user surveillance on your vanity blog. Right, Doc? There's no useful information here, so Hackernews reverse-engineers Zoom's Mac OS program (okay, okay: Hackernews reads about someone else reverse-engineering Zoom's Mac OS program on Twitter) and then stoke the rage fires even futher -- not only does this company do business with Facebook, it abuses a bad package manager as well! Hackernews, faced with this cavalcade of turpitude, is forced to take firm and drastic action: grumpy posting on a web forum, followed by several hours of Zoom meetings.

The internet should be a public utility
March 28, 2020 (comments)
Quartz continues to shit out a harried stream of barely-coherent thinkpieces with "coronavirus" in the titles. Hackernews is disappointed with residential internet connections and blames Boomers.

WireGuard 1.0 for Linux 5.6
March 29, 2020 (comments)
The Linux kernel sprouts a seven hundredth network encryption feature, and we are assured that this one is the good one for real this time. Hackernews is extremely grateful for this development, as they suspect it might get simpler to watch their home Plex server at work without getting caught by IT. Nobody is actually allowed to go into work to try it because of the plague quarantines, so they limit themselves to recommending other networking gadgets to play with in the meantime. Fun fact: this same story was posted (via a different mail list mirror) the next day and not only was the highest-voted story THAT day as well, it was higher-voted than THIS one. Hackernews moderators could not stand the sheer disorder of things and dumped all tomorrow's comments into this article.

WeWork sells Meetup
March 30, 2020 (comments)
The most hilariously topical coporate trade occurs. Hackernews is glad that the assholes let go of an otherwise useful site, but can't decide if what is essentially a shared calendar service with a really shitty interface is a viable business or not. Other Hackernews debate what the hell all those people do all day, why it takes a couple hundred people to run a site that could be replaced tomorrow by Craigslist, and how terrible it is that venture capitalists keep supporting these bullshit companies, instead of real value-producing organizations that bring needed improvements to the human condition, like "crowdfunding for funerals" or "AirBnB for sheds."

Honda bucks industry trend by removing touchscreen controls
March 31, 2020 (comments)
Exactly the same article as last time, except it's Honda instead of Mazda, and Autocar is stupid enough to open their article with "Honda has done what no other car maker is doing." Hackernews' response is utterly indistinguishable from the last time I covered it, except for the couple dozen Hackernews pasting these same links.

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pic.twitter.com/FdXYZKXOkX

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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Rolling

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Fortunately, by the time grave robbery turns out to be illegal, they have enough venture capital that laws don't apply.


Today's News:
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Formatting a Paper for MLA Style With Ulysses Style Sheets

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Formatting a Paper for MLA Style With Ulysses Style Sheets

Style sheets are what give Ulysses its versatility; they allow us to use the app’s inline commands to export for both digital and print media. Being able to customize them, particularly if you need to print according to certain standards, is a critical part of making Ulysses function as a home for all of your writing projects.

If you’re working on a Mac, you can download and edit style sheets, and Ulysses will automatically sync them with your iOS devices. Potentially, Ulysses can distribute texts to all your publishing destinations and your mobile devices, all from within a personal organization system that preserves and organizes the original draft.

So, how do you make style sheets start to work for you?

We can start by practicing some basic customization techniques using a simple style with a clear-cut goal in mind: a college paper set to MLA formatting standards.

If you are a college student working on a deadline, you need confidence that your work in Ulysses will translate efficiently into the proper format to meet your professor’s expectations. For many of us, that means Modern Language Association formatting for much of the work you turn in. While the customization techniques in this article apply to Ulysses style sheets in general, the focus here is to help you get from draft to print efficiently and in style.

Getting Started

Inside the Ulysses style library, there are at least three styles for academic papers. We’re going to work with the Papers style, because it uses MLA standard margins and already has the font set to Times New Roman, the favorite font of most college classrooms.

To get started, you’ll need to open TextEdit inside your Mac and disable “smart dashes”. Other CSS editors such as TextMate and Sublime Text (if you like colored highlighting) also work well. — To begin, open the Preferences from the Ulysses menu and highlight the Styles tab on the far right.

  • Right-click on the Papers style and select Duplicate.
  • Then, right-click on the duplicate (marked “copy”) and select the “Edit in” option.
  • A dropdown menu will appear. Select an editor from the dropdown menu, and the style sheet will open automatically in the editor.

Now, inside the editor window, you’re looking at the code that formats your paper in the Papers style. Notice that the margins are set to 1-inch, and that the font is set to Times New Roman, all wonderful things for writing a standard MLA paper.

A good place to begin customizing is with the font since you will want to be able to control fonts in most of your projects. Scroll down to the line of code that reads

defaults   {
	font-family:               Times New Roman
}

If you prefer to write in Helvetica, for example, simply replace “Times New Roman” with “Helvetica.” That’s it; you’ve customized a style sheet.

Working with Headings

If all you want to do for this style is change the font, you could stop here, and the new style will be instantly available for export. If you want to rename your style sheet for easier reference, you can right-click on the new copy and rename it there (“Papers-Helvetica,” for instance).

In order to match MLA style, however, we need to make some additional changes. So, let’s dig a little deeper and perform a basic customization of the headers in Papers.

Headings really are the core of the style sheet. They are the style element you control when you use a hashtag or a series of hashtags (#, ##, ###, …). You’ve probably already used them to change font sizes in your titles and subheadings, but they take on a new life inside style sheets.

Scroll down a bit further inside the style sheet to the long section under // Headers. You’ll see code blocks for each individual heading. This is the code that interprets your inline hashtags. By setting page-alignment, font type and size, and indention, they can be used to manage essentially any kind of formatting element, from the title of your paper to character names in a screenplay.

Here, we’ll use them to title your paper and to add the header with your name, date, and course information that goes in the top left corner of your title page, per MLA recommendations, of course.

Since we don’t usually bold titles in MLA format, I’ve changed the weight of Header 1 to normal:

heading-1 {
    style-title:            “Heading 1”
    text-alignment:         center
    font-weight:            bold
}

becomes:

heading-1 {
    style-title:            “Heading 1”
    text-alignment:         center
    font-weight:            normal
}

Now the settings for Heading 1 (a single #) are in line with standard MLA format for a title. Don’t worry; you can still add italics as necessary using the inline command *.

I also changed the font-weight to normal for Heading 3, which already has a text-alignment value of left. With these two settings in place, Heading 3 can now be used for the header of your paper. Using a separate heading for each line, your Ulysses sheet should look like this:

Formatting a Paper for MLA Style With Ulysses Style Sheets

Block Quotes

MLA standards require that quotes of more than four lines long should be in “block quotes”. That means that the entire quote will be indented a 1/2 inch inside the main body text to indicate clearly that the quote is not part of your own work.

In the Papers style, the text in a block quote is set with italics, which we need to change because MLA standards require block quotes in the same font as the main body text. So, again,

Block-quote {
	style-title: block quote
	margin-left: indent
	font-slant: italics 
}

becomes:

Block-quote {
	style-title: block quote
	margin-left: indent
	font-slant: normal
}

The inline command for a block quote is the >, and these characters can be stacked, much like using the “tab” key on a typewriter, to create multiple indentations. Additionally, if you are quoting poetry and need to take manual control of whitespace to present the original spacing, you can use non-breaking whitespace with ⌥⇧Space (option-shift-space). This will allow you to add extra whitespace that the style sheet will preserve in the final export.

That covers the basics of formatting an MLA paper using Ulysses style sheets. You can download the version of Papers I made for this article from the Ulysses style sheet library. If customizing a style sheet seems like a long process, remember that once you have a custom style sheet in your library, it will work for more than one project, and you’ll be able to manage style elements effortlessly as you type using the familiar inline commands.

(The procedure for customizing a style sheet, along with a more detailed look at style sheet code, can be found here.)

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mkalus
5 hours ago
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How We Buy Coffee

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From Dianna:

How we buy coffee beans in these days – a genuine back-alley transaction.

A virtual hand slap to the good folks at Revolver for supporting our caffeine needs.

 

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mkalus
16 hours ago
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