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05/21/18 PHD comic: 'Upgrade'

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Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham
www.phdcomics.com
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title: "Upgrade" - originally published 5/21/2018

For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!

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mkalus
57 minutes ago
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1 public comment
jlvanderzwan
1 day ago
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So.. a set of JPGs?
ttencate
1 day ago
A .COM executable file.
jlvanderzwan
1 day ago
Not cross-platform though. But that does remind me that .BMP >>> .JPG in that regard

Mobility Pricing and Fairness

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The Metro Vancouver Mobility Pricing Independent Commission will release its report tomorrow. (Expect to hear the pat-pat-pat of running feet as politicians distance themselves from anything that looks like a ‘road tax.’)

This report will be just the opening round as everyone in the region deals with the inevitability of transformative change in our transportation system.

Regardless of the options, one of the key (and most contentious) issues is the concept of ‘fairness.’  In April, economist Marc Lee at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives provided of the first, detailed outlooks on this issue, in the CCPA’s report “Getting Around Metro Vancouver.”

From the April 16th CCPA news release about the report:

Mobility pricing takes away the illusion of ‘free roads,’ based on the principle that drivers must pay for the infrastructure and services they use. But fairness needs to be at the core of mobility pricing for it to pass the test of public opinion,” says Marc Lee, a senior economist with the CCPA BC Office.

For example, the high cost of housing in Metro Vancouver means low- and middle-income households may be forced to move further away from the central city to find affordable housing and spend hundreds of hours a year commuting.

“A key fairness concern is that low-income drivers who have no option but to drive are penalized while more affluent drivers, who live more centrally, can travel more quickly without noticing much impact on their budget,” Lee explained. …

For Metro Vancouver, his research shows that a fair mobility pricing system could learn from implementation of BC’s carbon pricing where a low-income credit is funded out of carbon tax revenues. …

Using mobility pricing revenues to expand public transit can further address congestion by getting more people out of their vehicles and would significantly benefit low-income households that tend to be more reliant on public transit. …

In the release, Lee argues that a fair mobility pricing system must:

  • address low income with a credit to assist people who have no option other than to drive; that is, to invest in mobility for disadvantaged groups as a matter of ‘transportation justice’.
  • expand public transit first, the idea being that investments in public transit are the only way to guarantee accessible mobility for all residents over the long-term.
  • level the playing field with other modes of transportation, which would pull ride-hailing and car-sharing services into the mobility pricing mix.

The dilemma, however, is this: a mobility charge that tries to ‘decongest’ the region’s traffic has to be high enough to change behaviour, which thus penalizes low-income drivers more than higher-income. Yet, if lower-income drivers are given a credit to offset the charge, it could eliminate any incentive to change behaviour.

Marc argues that the low-income car users would realize they could actually save money, both by receiving a credit and by driving less.

In any case, the ‘decongestion charge’ has to be visible in some way to have an effect. And we just hate visible charges, especially connected to the car. (It’s why media cover the increase in gas prices so relentlessly; it’s one of the only visible costs we see repeatedly.)

Expect, as well, that the definition of ‘low-income driver’ would raise the bar rather high, as is the case for the carbon tax; about 40 percent of British Columbians get a credit of some kind, and Marc suggests about one-third to 40 percent of mobility charges would be allocated to the a mobility credit.  A cash grab this is not.

Even then, I doubt a credit system would negate the belief by almost everyone that in some way or another, a mobility charge would be unfair for them, regardless of whether they were saving money. It’s the visibility that offends. We spent most of the 20th century providing a road system that seems to be free (hey, they’re called ‘freeways,’ aren’t they?) and hiding the costs of the car as much as possible.

Roads, in fact, are seen as one of the true democratic spaces in society. Assuming you have a car, it doesn’t matter whether you’re rich or poor, drive a beater or BMW; you have the same right to the road.

The last thing people want to see is driving becoming like housing — another way for inequity to divide us.

To avoid that, people are willing to put up with congestion more than they’re willing to admit.





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mkalus
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The Density and Affordability Debate

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The headline says it all.

And the rest of the article, by Adam Belz of Minnesota’s StarTribune, is worth the full read as well. It touches on a few Vancouver nerves.

Here’s an excerpt:

A city staffer explained the rising burden of rental prices on poor residents, and gently pushed a central theme of the draft plan — that the city must build more homes in more places — to a group peppered with skeptics.

“If you just let the market promote density, that doesn’t necessarily trickle down to affordable housing,” said Lara Norkus-Crampton, a south Minneapolis resident. “If it was just density that provided affordable housing, then Hong Kong and New York City would be the most affordable places on the planet, and they’re not.”

[This] view cuts to the core of the debate as the city takes public comment on a comprehensive plan that will be finalized before the end of the year. It would be a bold experiment, allowing fourplexes the same size as a large home in every residential neighbourhood, and dramatically loosening restrictions on the height and type of buildings allowed on dozens of transit routes throughout the city as part of an effort to drive down rental prices.

Economists agree that cities can stabilize the cost of housing by loosening zoning to allow more construction in more places. But few cities have done this since the 1950s, and those who study the economics of housing admit both that prices won’t immediately fall in neighbourhoods with new apartments, and that without a regional or even national move to relax single-family zoning laws, the effect of rising density on rents will be difficult to discern in Minneapolis.

“You still see prices that go up,” said Bryce Ward, an economist at the University of Montana. “It just means that they may not have gone up by as much as they would have otherwise.” …

Ward, who has co-authored several papers on zoning and affordability, said the public must understand that opposing density is a choice in favour of either sprawl or high prices.

“If you don’t like to densify and you don’t like sprawl, then the only other option is to just say ‘Sorry. Prices are going to be high,'” he said.

A fourth option, Ward said, would be much larger subsidies for housing or imposing rent control.

Heather Worthington, the city’s director of long-range planning, said the comprehensive plan is about far more than density. Promoting job growth, expanding access to public transit, adding different types of housing in different neighbourhoods and making the city more resilient to climate change are all parts of the plan.

“Building more housing in the city will not drive affordability on its own, but it is necessary as a prerequisite to other affordable housing strategies,” Worthington said.

Other tools include more public housing subsidies, along with better rules and incentives as new units are developed, she said.

“Density can be a dirty word in development, especially in a city where a single-family, 40- to 50-foot lot, has been a fairly dominant development type,” Worthington said. “So, I think pushback is natural.” …

David Albouy, an economist at the University of Illinois, who wrote a 2016 paper on density and affordability, said Becker is right in that the only surefire way to drive down prices is for cities all over a region to build more homes quickly. But he rejects the idea that more units don’t drive down prices. His models estimate that if the population remains constant, every 3 percent increase in the number of housing units results in a 2 percent decline in prices.

“It’s simple supply and demand,” he said. “When people start saying you build more and that shouldn’t bring prices down, that’s a little bit ridiculous.”

But on the neighbourhood level, the benefits of density may not be apparent, said Jenny Schuetz, an economist at the Brookings Institution, because newer housing is usually more expensive than the older housing it replaces, even though the increase in supply relieves pressure on the region as a whole.

“The truth is we’ve never really tried the experiment of just increasing density uniformly across a city, let alone a metropolitan area,” Schuetz said. “It sounds like Minneapolis is going farther than other places.”





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mkalus
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Datenschutz bei der Datenschutzmeldung beim Landesdatenschutzbeauftragten / Blog / Privat

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Im der DSGVO steht drin, daß man seinen Datenschutzbeauftragten bei der Aufsichtsbehörde zu melden hat. Der zuständige Landesdatenschutzbeauftragte hier in Thüringen hat dafür ein sehr interessantes Formular erstellt.

Das Formular

Zum einen ist das Formular keine online-Einreichung, die dem TLfDI die Arbeit erleichtern würde. Stattdessen ist handelt es sich um ein Microsoft Word-Dokument, das man ausfüllen und ausdrucken soll. Anschließend ist das Dokument auf dem Postweg zu versenden, da in der Einreichungsaufforderung keine eMail-Adresse angeben wird.

Der Inhalt des Formulars ist ebenfalls überraschend:

2018-05-24-161013_626x678_scrot

Da stellt sich die Frage, ob denn die Angaben überhaupt alle benötigt werden. Wozu braucht die Aufsichtsbehörde beispielsweise die Webseite des bestellten Datenschutzbeauftragten?

Und dann stellt sich die Frage, was man da eigentlich melden muß.

  • Die verantwortliche Stelle ist ja noch klar.
  • Kommt bei Datenschutzbeauftragter aber nun der Datenschutzbeauftragte hin oder nur dann, wenn es ein interner ist?
  • Oder wird ein interner DSB als externer gemeldet, bei dem das Auswahlfeld externer auf Nein gestellt wurde?

Für die Kirchgemeinde kann ich das gut ausfüllen. Zuerst die Gemeinde, dann der örtlich zuständige DSB der Landeskirche, und dann der extern bestellte DSB des Verbands der evangelischen Kirchen in Berlin. Auf Beschluß der Landessynode wurde also der (externe) DSB an Stelle des (örtlichen) DSB für zuständig erklärt. Aber sonst?

Das Leak

Öffnet man aber die Eigenschaften des Dokumentes (was ich getan habe, weil das Dokument sich heute am Tag verändert zu haben schien), dann staunt man:

2018-05-24-154240_520x675_scrot

Autsch.

Wo meldet man diesen Datenschutzverstoß eigentlich?

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mkalus
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Oh und wo wir gerade bei Datenschutz waren: Ein Leser ...

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Oh und wo wir gerade bei Datenschutz waren: Ein Leser schickt mir Auszüge aus einer Foodora-Rundmail. Hier sind sie:
   Sie können unsere neue Datenschutzerklärung bereits heute sehen. Die neue
   Datenschutzerklärung wird ab dem 25. Mai 2018 gelten und unsere bisherige ersetzen.

   Wenn Sie unsere Website nach dem 25. Mai 2018 besuchen, stimmen Sie den
   Aktualisierungen automatisch zu.
Ja, äh, nee, so funktioniert das nicht.
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mkalus
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Wo wir gerade beim Datenschutz waren: Die Erfüllung ...

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Wo wir gerade beim Datenschutz waren: Die Erfüllung eines Vertrages darf nicht an eine Einverständniserklärung gekoppelt werden. Daten, die für die Erfüllung notwendig sind, dürfen erhoben werden. Anderen Erhebungen muss der Benutzer explizit zustimmen. Koppelungen ala "Sie dürfen bei uns nur Nachrichten lesen, wenn Sie zustimmen, dass wir Ihre Daten missbrauchen" sind nicht zulässig. Google-Stichwort: Kopplungsverbot DSGVO.

Nur falls das jemand noch nicht mitgekriegt hatte.

Oh und nur weil man Bestandskunde ist, heißt das nicht, dass man ohne explizite Einwilligung bespammt werden darf. Die Einwilligung darf nicht Opt-Out sein, und wie gesagt auch nicht an den Vertragsabschluss gekoppelt sein.

Ich gehe davon aus, dass das Spamvolumen aus Europa drastisch abnehmen wird.

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mkalus
2 hours ago
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